recall – quesadillas

September 30, 2006 at 10:52 am (Allergy News!, recalls)

***THE FOOD ALLERGY & ANAPHYLAXIS NETWORK SPECIAL FOOD ALLERGY ALERT
NOTICE***

Special Allergy Alert Notice
MILK ALLERGY ALERT
September 29, 2006

ANA Bakery is recalling their “quesadilla” due to undeclared milk.

The recalled quesadilla weighs 2-oz. and is packaged in plastic wrap.
The “quesadillas” have been sold in the Long Island and New York area.

Consumers who have purchased the “quesadilla” may return it to the place of
purchase. Consumers with questions may contact the company at (516) 880-
5269.

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soy alert

September 27, 2006 at 8:27 pm (Allergy News!, recalls)

**THE FOOD ALLERGY & ANAPHYLAXIS NETWORK SPECIAL FOOD ALLERGY ALERT
NOTICE**

SOY ALLERGY ALERT
September 27, 2006

Snack Alliance, Inc. is recalling nacho flavored tortilla chips due to
undeclared soy.

Packages of Nacho flavored tortilla chips having a best by date prior to
and including FEBRUARY 7, 2007.  The date which can be found in the upper
right hand corner of packages. They were sold in retail stores under the
following brands:

*Laura Lynn Nacho Flavored Tortilla Chips, 13-ounce package distributed in
the Southeastern US

*Southern Home Nacho Flavored Tortilla Chips, 13-ounce package distributed
in the Southeastern US

*Filler Brand Nacho Flavored Tortilla Chips, 1, 1.5, and 9-ounce packages
distributed in Puerto Rico

*Kid Connection Nacho Flavored Tortilla chips as a component in Kid
Connection variety snack sacks, 1 -ounce packages with Julian code dates
of 17706 to 19106 distributed nationally by WAL-MART

*Food Lion Nacho Flavored Tortilla Chips as a component in Food Lion
variety snack sacks, 1-ounce packages distributed in the Eastern US

*Food Express Cantina Style Nacho Tortilla Chips, 16-ounce packages
distributed in Ohio

Consumers may return the product to the place of purchase for a full
refund.  Consumers with questions may contact the company at (800) 665-
3880.

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Help spread the word about Allergy News!

September 26, 2006 at 12:16 pm (Allergy News!, Blog & Websites)

Are you on myspace?  Add me as a friend!  Better yet, make Allergy News one of your Top 8.

The more people we get listening to the show, contributing comments and stories, the more we will spread the reality of allergic living.  Let’s remove the monkey from our backs, find a cure, and spread compassion!

Thanks for your support!

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Allergykids.com coupon code

September 24, 2006 at 9:39 am (Allergy News!, Products, Websites)

Just enter WARE at checkout to receive 5% off of any order at http://www.allergykids.com This coupon is good until we fund the cure and knock this thing out!

Tell Robyn that I sent ya!

ALSO–I want to thank all of you for supporting allergyware.com.  I have a few new designs in the queue (per your request).  Please continue to let me know how I can serve you–and if what I have doesn’t meet your needs, just ask.  If I can’t make it, I probably know someone who can!  In fact, you can probably click the category “Products” over there on the right-hand side of this blog and find some links to other allergy-alert-gear purveyors.  We’re all in this together, truly!

PS  did you see the new pink and blue offerings?

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Safe@School Program

September 22, 2006 at 2:31 pm (Allergy News!, social issues)

Dear AllergyKids Friends-

We are proud to launch the AllergyKids Safe@School Program to help schools develop and implement comprehensive food allergy policies tailored to each school’s unique environment and culture.

We have partnered with Food Allergy Smart to offer this program as a tool to create a safer school environment for your child, and we will provide discussion guides for you to download and use each month.

You can download the Safe@School program at AllergyKids.com to use as a tool to help educate your child’s teachers, principals, nurses and other classroom parents about the severity of food allergies.

You can also download Letters to Principals, Teachers and Classroom Parents at http://www.allergykids.com that will help in your efforts to identify and protect your child at school.

If we can assist in your efforts to help protect your AllergyKid, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Robyn O`Brien
Founder, AllergyKids
robyn@allergykids.com
1.800.671.1525
…………………………………………………………………………
Until there’s a cure, there’s AllergyKids™
http://www.allergykids.com

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Recalls

September 22, 2006 at 2:05 pm (Allergy News!, recalls)

**THE FOOD ALLERGY & ANAPHYLAXIS NETWORK SPECIAL FOOD ALLERGY ALERT NOTICE**

SOY ALLERGY ALERT
September 21, 2006

Wise Foods, Inc. is initiating an East Coast recall of all sizes of Nacho
Tortilla chips due to undeclared soy.

The products were distributed on the East Coast and are identified as
follows, with the code dates on the top right portion of the bag:

Wise brand Nacho Tortilla Chips with Bag Code up to and including JAN2907
Bravo brand Nacho Tortilla Chips with Bag Code up to and including JAN2907
Moore’s brand Nacho Tortilla Chips with Bag Code up to and including JAN2907
Hannaford brand Nacho Tortilla Chips with Bag Code up to and including
NOV1306
Giant Gustados brand Nacho Tortilla Chips with Bag Code up to and including
NOV1306
Stop & Shop Gustados brand Nacho Tortilla Chips with Bag Code up to and
including NOV1306
Tops Gustados brand Nacho Tortilla Chips with Bag Code up to and including
NOV1306

Consumers may return these products to the place of purchase for a full
refund. Consumers with questions may call the company at (888) 759-4401.

MILK ALLERGY ALERT
September 21, 2006

U.S. Trading Co. is recalling Dragonfly Brand puddings due to undeclared
milk.

The products were distributed in retail stores in California, Minnesota,
Nevada, Oregon, and Wisconsin. All Codes are affected in this recall.

The products are identified as follows:

Dragonfly Brand Mango Pudding, 2.82-oz., packed in 6 clear plastic cups
Dragonfly Brand Banana Pudding, 2.82-oz., packed in 6 clear plastic cups
Dragonfly Brand Jackfruit Pudding, 2.82-oz., packed in 6 clear plastic cups
Dragonfly Brand Pink Guava Pudding, 2.82-oz., packed in 6 clear plastic cups
Dragonfly Brand Coconut Pudding, 2.82-oz., packed in 6 clear plastic cups
Dragonfly Brand Pandan Pudding, 2.82-oz., packed in 6 clear plastic cups
Dragonfly Brand Papaya Pudding, 2.82-oz., packed in 6 clear plastic cups
Dragonfly Brand Taro Pudding, 2.82-oz., packed in 6 clear plastic cups
Dragonfly Brand Assorted Pudding, 50.76-oz., packed in a clear plastic
container
Dragonfly Brand Mini Lychee Pudding, 14-oz., packed in a clear plastic bag
Dragonfly Brand Mini Mango Pudding, 14-oz., packed in a clear plastic bag
Dragonfly Brand Mini Tropical Pudding, 14-oz., packed in a clear plastic bag
Dragonfly Brand Mini Tropical Pudding, 33.6-oz. packed in a clear plastic
container

Consumers may return these products to the place of purchase for a full
refund. Consumers with questions may call the company at (800) 453-5502.

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AAEG announcement for Louisville area folks:

September 17, 2006 at 1:48 pm (Allergy News!, social issues)

Laurie Mount Grimes, Ph.D., MPH
Licensed Clinical Psychologist
November 9th
7pm
Williamson Room, St. Francis in the Fields Church

Dr. Grimes is a clinical psychologist providing counseling to pediatric patients.  She plans to give a short talk about the different emotional stages that children go through when dealing with issues like food allergies and the coping strategies that we as parents can help teach them.  So, mark your calendars and invite anyone who you think might benefit:  teachers, grandparents, etc……

We can also discuss with Dr. Grimes the possibility of having her run an occasional support group so that our kids have a chance, not only to vent in a safe environment, but also a trusted adult to guide them through their issues.

Hope to see you there!!!!!
Brook

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Out of Town

September 17, 2006 at 1:32 pm (Allergy News!, Products)

Any special requests that might have been sent for shirts…those will be looked at w/ primary urgency when I get back from a trip out of town this coming week.  I promise!  You’re number one!

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Catholic schools in Cincinnati now allowing epi-pens

September 17, 2006 at 1:24 pm (Allergy News!, social issues)

Who in their right mind would NOT ALLOW LIFE-SAVING MEDICATION to be with a child who needs it?  What the hell were they thinking all this time???

Important read for those in the Catholic school community:

UPDATED: 10:16 AM
Peanut allergy prompts change in school rule
Student with peanut allergies allowed adrenaline shot
BY William Croyle
The Cincinnati Enquirer

COVINGTON — A school that would not allow a boy who is allergic to peanuts to keep a shot of adrenaline on site has agreed to let him.

Jeffrey Downs, 11, is in sixth grade at Holy Family School. One day at school last spring Jeffrey bit a peanut. He spit it out immediately, but his body was already reacting.

“His cheeks swelled up and his chin turned purple and red,” his mother, Amy Downs, said. “He was swollen for a couple days.”

Downs knew her son was allergic, but until then, didn’t know how severely.

That prompted her to get a prescription for a couple of EpiPens, which carry a shot of adrenaline. When injected in the thigh of someone having an allergic reaction, the adrenaline can buy some time to get medical help.

Downs said that when school started this year, she asked to keep one there, but was told she couldn’t because of a school policy that prohibits needles.

“They were very sympathetic, but wouldn’t allow it,” Downs said. “But I was afraid if something accidentally happened again, his throat might close.”

That’s what happened to Emily Vonder Meulen about the same time Jeffrey had his reaction. The 13-year-old Delhi girl died April 13, about 20 minutes after eating a sandwich at a deli. The sandwich apparently accidentally contained a peanut, based on her blood stream.

Neither Emily nor her family carried an EpiPen.

After reading about Emily in an Enquirer story this past Sunday, the Downs family pressured Holy Family to allow the EpiPen. On Thursday, after consulting with Diocese of Covington officials, the school decided to allow it. School staff will be trained in how to administer it.

“These are life and death matters,” said Tim Fitzgerald, spokesman for the diocese. “When policies confront harsher realities, there have to be exceptions made.”

Several schools in the diocese allow EpiPens, including Holy Trinity; Mary, Queen of Heaven; St. Catherine of Siena; and St. Mary. Fitzgerald said that in the nine years Principal Polly Duplace has been at Holy Family, including seven as a teacher, this is the first request to keep an EpiPen at school.

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Allergy death in Cincinnati

September 17, 2006 at 1:22 pm (Allergy News!, social issues)

Finally, details:

We still have a lot of work to do:

More than seasonal allergies
For some, food can be fatal
BY WILLIAM CROYLE | ENQUIRER STAFF WRITER
BELLEVUE – It’s lunchtime at Holy Trinity School. The kids are eating in the cafeteria – but not Kendall and Kelsey Gearns.

Kendall, a first-grader, is eating in an elementary classroom with a friend and teacher. Kelsey, a sixth-grader, is eating with a friend in the junior high building’s main office.

They do this every school day. Their parents insist on it because the girls’ food allergies are potentially fatal.

They can’t go near peanuts, tree nuts and soy. Kendall also has to avoid shellfish. Ingesting or touching these foods can trigger a reaction ranging from a rash to death.

Each girl always carries a bag with an inhaler, Benadryl and two EpiPens, each of which carries a shot of adrenalin that, when injected in the thigh of someone having an allergic reaction, will buy time to get medical help.

“I would rather be with everybody,” Kendall said while eating a ham sandwich, crackers and yogurt.

But she and Kelsey understand the isolation is for their safety.

“I’m used to it,” said Kelsey. “It gets easier to deal with.”

“We try to make life as normal as possible,” said mother Kim Gearns. “But people need to understand that my children can die from this.”

It did happen to Emily Vonder Meulen, daughter of Paul and Catrina Vonder Meulen of Delhi.

DEATH FROM AN ALLERGY

Emily knew she was allergic to peanuts. If her tongue touched food that contained them, her throat would tingle.

In fact, that’s how she and her parents determined what was safe for her to eat.

“We got comfortable with that protective system,” said Catrina.

But on April 13, that system failed the 13-year-old.

Emily was at a Cincinnati deli where she ordered a chicken teriyaki sandwich, something she’d eaten before. But, about 10 minutes after she finished it, she struggled to breathe.

Catrina called 911, but it was too late. It happened that fast.

Catrina said Emily was dead in about 20 minutes from anaphylaxis – a sudden allergic reaction that can affect various parts of the body, including the respiratory tract and cardiovascular system. She said the coroner found high peanut levels in Emily’s bloodstream.

Catrina said there is no evidence that the sandwich caused it, but the reaction happened so soon after Emily finished it. Paul said it’s all she had eaten that day.

“What could have caused this reaction could have been a microgram of peanut butter” that got in the sandwich, Catrina said.

The Vonder Meulens said they were unprepared, never thinking Emily could die from her food allergies. They said they fell into a comfort zone, too dependent on her tongue-touching method for what she could safely eat. When she was 10, they stopped carrying an EpiPen because she had never had a severe reaction.

Now the Vonder Meulens want to make sure parents of kids with food allergies and the general public don’t underestimate how quickly and deadly these reactions can be. They’ve posted an open letter called “Emily’s Story” on http://www.allergykids.com, a Web site that promotes food allergy awareness.

“… We want you to be scared,” they write, “so that you stay vigilant in protecting your child.”

SCARED INTO VIGILANCE

In Northern Kentucky, several kids with food allergies have had close calls – fortunately with their parents nearby.

First-grader Rachel Ryan at Mary, Queen of Heaven School in Erlanger was 2 when she ate a peanut butter cracker. She broke into hives and struggled to breathe.

Jude Ampfer, a kindergartner at St. Catherine of Siena School in Fort Thomas, is allergic to eggs. When he was 3, he ate a snack that had egg whites in it. He swelled, broke into a rash and threw up violently.

Eight-year-old Keenan Bode at Beechwood School was a year old when he had an allergic reaction to peanuts. His parents used an EpiPen and were able to get him to an emergency room.

Katie Reis, a third-grader at St. Mary School in Alexandria, once ate what her mother thought was a solid chocolate egg – but it had peanut butter in it.

“We were halfway to the hospital, and she was covered in hives and looking comatose,” said mother Shirley Reis. “That was my only episode and hopefully my last.”

HELP FROM SCHOOLS

If that is to be Reis’ last episode, she’ll need help from Katie’s school.

All of these mothers say it’s difficult to let their kids go to school, spending hours away from them, but they say the schools have been very cooperative in creating a safe environment.

All of these kids’ schools do some or all of the following: make the child’s classroom free of the food to which they’re allergic; have a peanut-free lunch menu; have lunch tables for kids with food allergies and their friends who don’t bring those foods; stock EpiPens and train staff to use them; have all students wash their hands after lunch; and let these parents send a letter to parents of their child’s classmates which explains the severity of the allergies.

“You do what you’ve got to do,” said Sister Mary Ruth Lubbers, principal at Holy Trinity. “I think we’re very prepared, and the other kids handle it real well too. They watch out for Kelsey and Kendall.”

Shelli Wilson, principal at Cline Elementary School in Cold Spring, has four students with peanut allergies. Cline has a peanut-free menu and special tables for those kids.

“It’s our responsibility to keep them safe,” said Wilson.

In Ohio, food allergies are a big concern at Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy Elementary School in Symmes Township, where no popcorn is popped before 3 p.m.

That’s because even the smell of popcorn oil triggers a reaction in 9-year-old Craig Fields, who is allergic to wheat, corn, soy, eggs and peanuts.

“The entire elementary school has just rallied around him and his allergies, so he’s able to go to school and not worry about having a reaction,” said his mother, Debby Fields.

At Norwood View Elementary, all of Matthew Evans’ classmates wash their hands with wet wipes after lunch and before recess. That’s because the 7-year-old second-grader is allergic to cow’s milk protein.

His food allergy is so severe that even the residue from milk or cheese on hands or doorknobs could trigger a reaction, such as shortness of breath or turning blue on the top of his head.

Matthew used to sit at a lunchroom table alone, but it didn’t take him long to feel isolated, said his mother, Karen Evans, who asked the school to try something else. Now, he sits at a lunchroom table with a counselor who makes sure there’s no cross-contamination. Other students who aren’t drinking milk or eating dairy products can sit with him.

“There’s a lot of isolation involved with these types of kids,” Evans said. “You don’t tend to have your children invited to birthday parties and play dates out of fear. People are just afraid that something is going to happen.”

Parents of children with food allergies often do whatever it takes to keep their kids safe. Evans quit her job of 13 years in a pharmacy two years ago so that she could manage Matthew’s allergies. She’s an active room parent for classroom parties, doing all of the baking for them.

STILL NERVOUS

These mothers say that as hard as they try to trust schools, restaurants, neighbors or anywhere else their kids go, there are still some people who don’t understand the severity of these allergies.

“The more I educate myself, the more worried I get about it because other people aren’t always educated,” said Amy Ryan. “Peanut butter is like a weapon to (Rachel) and some people don’t realize that.”

Reporter Cindy Kranz contributed to this story. E-mail wcroyle@nky.com

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